Home Worship Planning Preaching Resources The Pentecost Challenge: Made of Clay. Strong as Gold.

The Pentecost Challenge: Made of Clay. Strong as Gold.

A Worship Service Celebrating our Resilience and Community

By Rev. Lydia E. Muñoz

Hands working clay pottery 72px

(Note: Scroll down to read a Spanish translation of this article.)

Key Scriptures:

2 Corinthians 4:7-10 (NRSV)

But we have this treasure in clay jars, so that it may be made clear that this extraordinary power belongs to God and does not come from us. We are afflicted in every way, but not crushed; perplexed, but not driven to despair; persecuted, but not forsaken; struck down, but not destroyed; always carrying in the body the death of Jesus, so that the life of Jesus may also be made visible in our bodies.

Acts 2:42-47 (NRSV)

They devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching and fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers. Awe came upon everyone because, many wonders and signs were being done by the apostles. All who believed were together and had all things in common; they would sell their possessions and goods and distribute the proceeds to all, as any had need. Day by day, as they spent much time together in the temple, they broke bread at home and ate their food with glad and generous hearts, praising God and having the goodwill of all the people. And day by day the Lord added to their number those who were being saved.

Central Theme:

Resilience and Community: The reality is that we can do hard things even in our frailty and our brokenness. Pentecost people know that we hold the power of God in our brokenness and in our weakness and that being vulnerable is indeed where the Pentecost power shows up to break us free from narratives that internalized oppression has created to hold us back. Pentecost people create transformative, courageous, and powerful places for people to share the entirety of their story that, when weaved together, creates a salvific community of liberation.

Decentering Moments:

1. Thinking about clay.

Paul’s reference to clay in 2 Corinthians 4:7 doesn’t seem to be accidental. (“But we have this treasure in clay jars, so that it may be made clear that this extraordinary power belongs to God and does not come from us. – NRSV). I believe Paul is intentional about the use of the word “clay” since some of the main themes of Corinthians are about living as siblings and being bound not to one person but to Christ. Paul understands human nature, especially our frailty and propensity to want to compete with one another and our drive to be above one another in stature, wealth, and power. Author Kelly Brown Douglas reminds us about how the Roman historian Tacitus in 98 C.E. put together the first full description of what a pure race looked like and how that people’s collective good morals brought about the defeat of the Roman Empire. Although Tacitus’s work was meant to provide a critique of the Romans, it resulted in the beginning of Anglo-Saxon superiority over and above other groups of people, according to Douglas. [1] White superiority was developed, not just in skin tone but in the system of whiteness by which most of society measures all things.

Paul reminds us in 2 Corinthians that we are all made out of the same “Adamah,” which is the Hebrew noun for “ground” or “earth.” Because of this, we all share in the creation and the chaos equally. What does it mean for us as we consider this text to be called clay vessels? How does that make us equal and how does that respect our differences? If we are all fragile clay vessels that must be handled with care and support, yet we are strong enough to carry the treasure of the liberating good news of the gospel and the power of the Holy Spirit that dwells within us, then what does that say about God and how God sees us?

Acts 2:42: They devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching and fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers. Awe came upon everyone because, many wonders and signs were being done by the apostles. All who believed were together and had all things in common; they would sell their possessions and goods and distribute the proceeds to all, as any had need. Day by day, as they spent much time together in the temple, they broke bread at home and ate their food with glad and generous hearts, praising God and having the goodwill of all the people. And day by day the Lord added to their number those who were being saved.

2. The Power of Weakness in Community

In Acts 2, we see a community newly minted by the Holy Spirit. What is remarkable to think—and we don’t often make the connection to—was that Peter just preached to about three thousand and the scripture says more and more people were added day by day. This is a megachurch, probably the first one. But think about the constituents of this church as they are described in the beginning part of the chapter. These are according to Acts 2:9-11 (NRSV), “Parthians, Medes, Elamites, and residents of Mesopotamia, Judea and Cappadocia, Pontus and Asia, Phrygia and Pamphylia, Egypt and the parts of Libya belonging to Cyrene, and visitors from Rome, both Jews and proselytes, Cretans and Arabs – in our own languages we hear them speaking about God’s deeds of power.” Remember that?

We are talking about a multicultural community that lived in communal life together, breaking bread together, and selling all their possessions to share with one another. Don’t look now, but in today’s political rhetoric, we would call that socialism! Most important, if the above group is the group we are talking about, then we are considering people who would never have come together under any other circumstance. Act 2:9-11 is a list of Israel’s mortal enemies and competitors politically, socially, and ethnically. Yet, this is what it means to be Pentecost people – we make the impossible happen.

How do we do this? We do this through our shared humanity. We have been given this treasure in jars of clay. WE! The people! WE! The ordinary. WE! The misfits and quirky! WE the brown, black, indigenous, the Asian, the gay, the straight, the male, the female, and those who are gender non-conforming. WE! The victims of our shared history. WE! The perpetrators and inheritors of a racist and bloody past. WE! The immigrant and the ones who forget that we are immigrants too.

We come together as those who have nothing else to lose because we have lost it all and bear our scars out in the open. It is this common place where we come to share our stories behind our scars and to be healed by the one who brings us all together through his scars. Nothing can be more powerful than a community that is willing to stand together in their weaknesses. Jesus said that is where the kin-dom is found.

Preaching Starter:

Since we are talking about the fragility of clay pots, some of the beautiful examples of this kind of artwork that makes beautiful things out of scars or broken things are mosaics, which are both ancient and new and can be found in communities around the world. We have all seen the incredible pieces of art that have been done with chards of class or tile. By themselves, they are just broken pieces; but together, they become a work of art.

The image below is Japanese kintsugi pottery or “golden repair.” Visit or research Japanese kintsugi because it is intentional about highlighting the scars and broken parts as the very center of its art.

Tiffany Ayuda describes it in NBC Today:

Kintsugi is the Japanese art of putting broken pottery pieces back together with gold — built on the idea that in embracing flaws and imperfections, you can create an even stronger, more beautiful piece of art. Every break is unique and instead of repairing an item like new, the 400-year-old technique actually highlights the "scars" as a part of the design. Using this as a metaphor for healing ourselves teaches us an important lesson: Sometimes in the process of repairing things that have broken, we actually create something more unique, beautiful and resilient.[2]

Kintsugi pottery 72px
Japanese kintsugi pottery

Questions for reflection:

  • How does this ancient art form inform our notion of being called “treasures in jars of clay”?
  • If you and I can be in a community that values our broken parts, how does that become a way of being a welcoming community of Jesus’ followers?

It is my belief that it is not creeds or declarations of what we believe that draws people to our communities of faith. It is and always will be our ability to follow Jesus in welcoming the poor, the outcast, the lonely, the rejected, the tore-up and broken-up and in recognizing ourselves in their scars.


[1] Kelly Douglas Brown. Stand Your Ground: Black Bodies and the Justice of God (Orbis Books, 2015).

[2] Tiffany Ayuda. “How the Japanese Art of Kintsugi Can Help You Deal with Stressful Situations,” Better by Today (April 25, 2018), https://www.nbcnews.com/better/health/how-japanese-art-technique-kintsugi-can-help-you-be-more-ncna866471.


Copyright 2021 Lydia E. Muñoz. Published by The General Board of Discipleship of The United Methodist Church, PO Box 340003, Nashville TN 37203. Website www.umcdiscipleship.org/worship. The content of this resource can be reproduced and used in worship with the inclusion of the complete copyright citation on each copy. It may not be sold, used for profit, republished, or placed on a website unless asking permission to use by the copyright owner, Lydia E. Muñoz.


EL RETO DE PENTECOSTÉS: Hechos de barro, fuertes como el oro

Culto de adoración: Celebrando nuestra comunidad y resiliencia

Por la Rev. Lydia E. Muñoz

Escrituras clave:

2a a los Corintios 4:7-10 (Nueva Traducción Viviente, 2010)

Ahora tenemos esta luz que brilla en nuestro corazón, pero nosotros mismos somos como frágiles vasijas de barro que contienen este gran tesoro. Esto deja bien claro que nuestro gran poder proviene de Dios, no de nosotros mismos. Por todos lados nos presionan las dificultades, pero no nos aplastan. Estamos perplejos pero no caemos en la desesperación. Somos perseguidos pero nunca abandonados por Dios. Somos derribados, pero no destruidos. Mediante el sufrimiento, nuestro cuerpo sigue participando de la muerte de Jesús, para que la vida de Jesús también pueda verse en nuestro cuerpo.

Hechos 2:42-47 (DHH, 1996)

Y eran fieles en conservar la enseñanza de los apóstoles, en compartir lo que tenían, en reunirse para partir el pan y en la oración. Todos estaban asombrados a causa de los muchos milagros y señales que Dios hacía por medio de los apóstoles. Todos los creyentes estaban muy unidos y compartían sus bienes entre sí; vendían sus propiedades y todo lo que tenían, y repartían el dinero según las necesidades de cada uno. Todos los días se reunían en el templo, y en las casas partían el pan y comían juntos con alegría y sencillez de corazón. Alababan a Dios y eran estimados por todos; y cada día el Señor hacía crecer la comunidad con el número de los que él iba llamando a la salvación.

Tema central:

La resiliencia y comunidad: la realidad es que podemos hacer cosas difíciles, incluso en nuestra fragilidad y quebrantamiento. La gente de Pentecostés sabemos que el poder de Dios habita en nuestro quebrantamiento y en nuestra debilidad y, que ser vulnerables es, de hecho, donde el poder de Pentecostés aparece para liberarnos de las narrativas que la opresión internalizada ha creado para detenernos. Las personas de Pentecostés crean lugares transformadores, valientes y poderosos, para que las personas compartan la totalidad de sus historias, que cuando se entrelazan crean una comunidad salvífica de liberación.

Momentos de descentralización:

1. Pensar en el barro

La referencia que hace Pablo sobre el barro, en el pasaje antes citado de Corintios, no parece ser accidental. Creo que Pablo fue muy intencional en el uso de esta palabra, ya que algunos de los temas principales tratados en

Corintios están relacionados con el vivir como hermanos y hermanas, y no depender de una persona sino a Cristo. La verdad es que Pablo comprendió la naturaleza humana, especialmente nuestra fragilidad y propensión de querer competir entre nosotros, y nuestro impulso de estar por encima de los demás en estatura, riqueza y poder. La autora, Kelly Brown Douglas, nos recuerda cómo el historiador romano, Tácito, en 98 E.C., recopiló la primera descripción completa de una raza pura, y cómo sus buenas costumbres colectivas vencieron al Imperio romano. Aunque su obra estaba destinada a proporcionar una crítica a los romanos, resultó ser el comienzo de la superioridad anglosajona de estar por encima de cualquier otro grupo de personas. [1] A través de él, se desarrolló la superioridad blanca, no solo en el tono de piel, sino en el sistema por el cual la mayoría de la sociedad mide todas las cosas.

Pablo le recuerda, en este caso, a Timoteo, que todos estamos hechos del mismo adamah, que es el sustantivo hebreo para «suelo o tierra». Debido a esto, todos compartimos la creación y el caos por igual. ¿Qué significa para nosotros que este texto sea titulado «Tesoros en vasijas de barro»? ¿Cómo eso nos hace iguales? Y, ¿cómo eso respeta nuestras diferencias? Si todos somos vasijas de barro frágiles, las cuales debemos manejar con cuidado y apoyo, y a la vez, somos lo suficientemente fuertes para llevar el tesoro de las buenas nuevas liberadoras del evangelio y el poder del Espíritu Santo, que mora en nosotros, entonces, ¿qué eso nos dice acerca de Dios, y cómo Dios nos ve?

2. El poder de la debilidad en la comunidad

En Hechos 2 vemos una comunidad recién creada por el Espíritu Santo. Lo que es notable de pensar –y con lo que no solemos establecer la conexión– fue que Pedro acaba de predicar a unas tres mil personas, y las Escrituras dicen que cada día se sumaban más y más personas. Esta fue una mega iglesia, probablemente la primera. Pero piensa en los componentes de esta iglesia, que se describen al inicio del capítulo. Veamos los versículos 9-11 del capítulo 2 de Hechos: «Aquí estamos nosotros: partos, medos, elamitas, gente de Mesopotamia, Judea, Capadocia, Ponto, de la provincia de Asia, de Frigia, Panfilia, Egipto y de las áreas de Libia alrededor de Cirene, visitantes de Roma (tanto judíos como convertidos al judaísmo), cretenses y árabes. ¡Y todos oímos a esta gente hablar en nuestro propio idioma acerca de las cosas maravillosas que Dios ha hecho!» (Nueva Traducción Viviente 2010). ¿Lo recuerdas?

Aquí estamos hablando de una comunidad multicultural que, según Hechos 2:42, vivían juntos en una vida comunitaria, partiendo el pan juntos y vendiendo todas sus posesiones para compartir las ganancias entre ellos. Y no te sorprendas de escuchar, ¡que en la retórica política de hoy llamaríamos a esta forma de vida socialismo! Más importante aún, si el grupo anterior es el grupo del que estamos hablando, entonces estas personas nunca se hubieran reunido bajo ninguna circunstancia. Hechos 2:9-11 es una lista de los enemigos mortales y competidores de Israel a niveles político, social y étnicos. Sin embargo, esto es lo que significa ser gente de Pentecostés: hacemos que suceda lo imposible.

¿Cómo hacemos esto? Lo hacemos a través de nuestra humanidad compartida. Se nos ha dado este tesorero en vasijas de barro. ¡NOSOTROS! ¡La gente! ¡NOSOTROS! Lo ordinario. ¡NOSOTROS! ¡Los inadaptados y extravagantes! NOSOTROS los morenos, los negros, los indígenas, los asiáticos, los homosexuales, los heterosexuales, los hombres y las mujeres y quienes no se ajustan al género. ¡NOSOTROS! Las víctimas de nuestra historia compartida. ¡NOSOTROS! Los autores y herederos de un pasado racista y sangriento. NOSOTROS, los inmigrantes y quienes nos olvidamos de que también somos inmigrantes. Nos unimos como aquellos que no tienen nada más que perder, porque lo hemos perdido todo, y llevamos nuestras cicatrices a la luz. Es este lugar común, donde venimos a compartir nuestras historias, detrás de nuestras cicatrices, y a ser sanados por Aquél quien une a todos y a todas a través de sus cicatrices. Nada puede ser más poderoso que una comunidad que esté dispuesta a mantenerse unida a través de sus debilidades. Jesús dijo que ahí es donde se encuentra el reino.

Ideas para el sermón:

Ya que estamos hablando de la fragilidad de las vasijas de barro, algunos de los hermosos ejemplos de este tipo de obras de arte, hermosas creaciones hechas con la grietas o de cosas rotas, son los primeros mosaicos que son antiguos y nuevos, y se pueden encontrar en comunidades de todo el mundo. Todos hemos visto las increíbles obras de arte que se han hecho con losetas o baldosas. Y cómo por sí solas son solo piezas rotas, pero juntas se convierten en una obra de arte.

La imagen abajo muestran vasijas reparadas a través de la técnica conocida como kintsugi (en japonés: carpintería de oro) o kintsukuroi o «reparación de oro». Recomiendo encarecidamente que visites o investigues sobre el kintsugi, porque es muy intencional en resaltar las grietas y las partes rotas como el centro mismo de su arte. Como lo describe Tiffany Ayuda en NBC Today:

«El kintsugi es el arte japonés de volver a juntar piezas de cerámica rotas con oro. Se fundamenta en la idea de que al aceptar los defectos e imperfecciones puedes crear una obra de arte aún más fuerte y hermosa. Cada grieta es única y, en lugar de reparar un artículo para dejarlo como nuevo, la técnica de más de 400 años, en realidad resalta las «grietas o cicatrices» como parte del diseño. Usar esto como una metáfora para sanarnos a nosotros mismos nos enseña una lección importante: a veces, en el proceso de reparar cosas que se han roto, en realidad creamos algo más único, hermoso y resistente».[2]

Kintsugi pottery 72px

Preguntas para la reflexión:

  • ¿Cómo esta antigua forma de arte – kintsugi– informa a nuestra noción de ser llamados «tesoros en vasijas de barro»?
  • Si tú y yo podemos estar en una comunidad que valora nuestras partes rotas, ¿cómo se convierte eso en una forma de ser una comunidad acogedora para los seguidores de Jesús?

Pienso que no son los credos o las declaraciones de lo que creemos lo que atrae a las personas a nuestras comunidades de fe. Es, y siempre será, nuestra capacidad de seguir a Jesús para acoger a los pobres, los marginados, los solitarios, los rechazados, los destrozados y quebrantados, y al reconocernos en sus cicatrices.


[1] Kelly Douglas Brown. Stand Your Ground: Black Bodies and the Justice of God (Orbis Books, 2015).

[2] Tiffany Ayuda. “How the Japanese Art of Kintsugi Can Help You Deal with Stressful Situations,” Better by Today (April 25, 2018), https://www.nbcnews.com/better/health/how-japanese-art-technique-kintsugi-can-help-you-be-more-ncna866471.


Derechos de autor @2021 Lydia E. Muñoz. Publicado por la Junta General de Discipulado de la Iglesia Metodista Unida, PO Box 340003, Nashville TN 37203. Página web https://www.umcdiscipleship.org/equipping-leaders/hispanic-latino. El contenido de este recurso puede ser reproducido y usado para la adoración al incluir la cita completa de derecho de autor en cada copia. No se autoriza vender, utilizar con fines de lucro o volver a publicar ni colocar en un sitio web sin la autorización de permiso de uso por la propietaria de los derechos de autor de este recurso, Lydia E. Muñoz, lydiae[email protected].

Contact Us for Help

View staff by program area to ask for additional assistance.

Related


Subscribe

* indicates required

Please confirm that you want to receive email from us.

You can unsubscribe at any time by clicking the link in the footer of our emails. For information about our privacy practices, please read our Privacy Policy page.

We use Mailchimp as our marketing platform. By clicking below to subscribe, you acknowledge that your information will be transferred to Mailchimp for processing. Learn more about Mailchimp's privacy practices here.