Home Offertory Prayers and Invitation to the Offering

Offertory Prayers and Invitation to the Offering

By Ken Sloane

Each month’s Offertory Prayers includes an “Invitation to the Offering” along with a digital image for those who might want to use it. We hope you will find this a helpful way to remind the people in your pews that their offering travels to many places to make a powerful difference in the lives of people they may never meet.

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Photo by E Julu Swen, UM News

August 2021

Your offering last week empowered ministry within our congregation and responded to the needs of our community. It also supported the COVID-19 response of our mission agency, Global Ministries, and its disaster response unit, UMCOR. Through the “Sheltering in Love” campaign and unit programming, we celebrate the far-reaching impact of 230 grants totaling $2,329,785 with a commitment to continued care and compassion in the fight against COVID-19. Collaborations with health professionals, missionaries, disaster management coordinators, and faith leaders have allowed for a global response to COVID-19 by Global Ministries and UMCOR. From the Philippines to Pennsylvania, Brazil to Burundi, peoples’ daily needs such as healthcare, food, hygiene, and job security are being met.

Through your giving, we helped equip local churches, annual conferences, and nonprofit organizations to be in mission with their communities; we are caring for one another and extending compassion to those left most vulnerable during this challenging time.

Ministries like these happen, thanks to the way the people of The United Methodist Church live and give connectionally.

I invite you to give generously, as we worship God through sharing our gifts, tithes, and offerings.

Click here to read more about Global Ministries' "Sheltering in Love" program.

Offertory Prayers

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UM News Photo by Mike DuBose

September 2021

Your offering last week empowered ministry within our congregation and responded to the needs of our community. It also supported the work of United Methodist Communications (also known as UMCom). Throughout the pandemic, they responded to an enormous outcry from churches – here and around the globe – as they moved into the world of video production and streaming over the internet. Their highly professional staff resourced churches around world – working together while working remotely from their homes. They provided these resources to local churches through the ResourceUMC webpage, while also keeping all of us up to date on what was happening across the church via daily news stories and newsletters.

Ministries like these happen, thanks to the way the people of The United Methodist Church live and give connectionally.

I invite you to give generously, as we worship God through sharing our gifts, tithes, and offerings.

Click here to read more about United Methodist Communications video production work.

Click here to explore training and resources for local church communications.

Offertory Prayers

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October 2021

Your offering last week empowered ministry within our congregation and responded to the needs of our community. It also supported the work of General Commission on Religion & Race (GCORR), who have been resourcing churches and leaders on anti-racism for many years. In June, they launched a podcast, Expanding the Table, which offers a platform for dialogue in a Christian context on topics that impact our work against racism.

Ministries like these happen, thanks to the way the people of The United Methodist Church live and give connectionally.

I invite you to give generously, as we worship God through sharing our gifts, tithes, and offerings.

Click here to read more about the Expanding the Table podcast.

Click here to explore training and resources to help local churches be actively anti-racist.

Offertory Prayers:

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UM News photo by Mike DuBose

November 2021

Your offering last week empowered ministry within our congregation and responded to the needs of our community. It also supported the work done by Bread for the World Institute in partnership with our General Board of Church Society and supported in part by our connectional giving.

The governments of 193 nations, including the U.S., adopted in 2015 the goal of ending hunger and malnutrition by 2030. In a report released August 29, 2019, Bread for the World listed five areas that could, if addressed, lead to accomplishment of this goal.

The “Back to Basics: How to End Hunger by 2030” report says that world hunger could be wiped out if there were better access to nutritional food; more jobs that pay enough to afford groceries; better success at bringing peace and justice to the world; women being more empowered; and solid progress being made against climate change.

“Ending hunger will take more than donating to food pantries or providing aid to communities and countries affected by natural disasters,” said Asma Lateef, director of Bread for the World. “While these are important and necessary, we can only end hunger by addressing root causes. To do that, everyone — governments, private businesses and individuals — needs to play a pivotal role.”

Ministries like these happen, thanks to the way the people of The United Methodist Church live and give connectionally. I invite you to give generously, as we worship God through sharing our gifts, tithes, and offerings.

Click here to read more about the work to end hunger by 2030.

Click here for more information on Bread for the World Institute.

Offertory Prayers

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UM News Photo by DooSoo Lee

Advent & Christmas 2021

Your offering last week empowered ministry within our congregation and responded to the needs of our community. It also supported the work done by the General Board of Higher Education & Ministry in endorsing and resourcing chaplains in a variety of ministries. One of those is military chaplain Rev. DooSoo Lee, who serves the needs of women and men of our armed forces away from their families.

Lee, a Korean American U.S. Army chaplain, currently serves and cares for soldiers at U.S. Army Garrison Humphreys – located in Pyeongtaek, along the western coast of South Korea, not far from Seoul. Lee is a full elder in the Northern Illinois Conference. After serving several local churches, he became a chaplain to the Selected U.S. Army Reserve in 2017. He has been an active-duty chaplain since 2018.

“Deployment to Korea is different from serving on assignment to a military unit in the Korean garrison,” he said. “It is similar to the difference between an interim pastor and an appointed pastor. It is a very special experience to be deployed to serve America in my motherland, where I was born and raised, as a chaplain of the U.S. Army.”

Ministries like these happen, thanks to the way the people of The United Methodist Church live and give connectionally. I invite you to give generously, as we worship God through sharing our gifts, tithes, and offerings.

Click here to read more about Rev. Lee's ministry in the U.S. Army.

Click here to read more on chaplaincy in the UMC.

Offertory Prayers

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January 2022

Your offering last week empowered ministry within our congregation and responded to the needs of our community. It also supported the work done by the General Council on Finance & Administration (GCFA) to help manage the ministry support needed to keep the outreach of The United Methodist Church strong, even during crises and pandemics.

Offering annual conferences their expertise in the “ministry of administration,” GCFA not only collects and distributes the apportioned funds given by local church members but it is also present to offer legal expertise through difficult situations. GCFA offers financial and human resources support for the whole church. Recently, the agency has been negotiating cost-saving arrangements with large vendors to free up more local church dollars for mission and ministry.

Ministries like these happen, thanks to the way the people of The United Methodist Church live and give connectionally. I invite you to give generously, as we worship God through sharing our gifts, tithes, and offerings.

Click here to read more about financial services offered by GCFA through United Methodist Church support.

Offertory Prayers

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GBGM Photo by Kim Ingram

February 2022

Your offering last week empowered ministry within our congregation and responded to the needs of our community. It also supported the work done by the General Board of Global Ministries, the mission arm of The United Methodist Church, in calling, preparing, and sending people into the mission field in other parts of the world and right here at home.

By June 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic had prompted many people around the world to just stay put. Rev. Julie Wilson (pictured) was not one of them. Her calling to serve as a missionary in the United States meant that she was going to be (safely) on the move.

Even though the pandemic deferred her official commissioning as a Church and Community Worker, Wilson was still virtually blessed and sent out to serve at Open Arms Community Center, a ministry of the Western North Carolina Annual Conference.

In July 2020, two weeks after arriving in Winston-Salem, Wilson wrote: “With the COVID-19 pandemic, we don’t quite know what this year will bring. But we have faith that God will lead us through.” (Julie was commissioned in person by Bishop Paul Leeland at the Western North Carolina Conference as pictured on June 19, 2021.)

Ministries like these happen, thanks to the way the people of The United Methodist Church live and give connectionally. I invite you to give generously, as we worship God through sharing our gifts, tithes, and offerings.

Click here to read more about U.S. Missionaries of the General Board of Global Ministries.

Offertory Prayers:

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UM News photo by Mike DuBose

March 2022

Your offering last week empowered ministry within our congregation and responded to the needs of our community. It also supported the largest number of fully accredited historically Black colleges and universities in the United States through the Black College Fund. These eleven United Methodist-related historically black colleges and universities reach students who often are first-generation college coeds. Gifts to the Black College Fund support solid and challenging academic programs, faculty development, strong faculties, well-equipped facilities, the maintenance of infrastructure, and financial support and scholarships for students.

Following the Civil War, the former Methodist Episcopal Church organized the Freedmen’s Aid Society to help educate African Americans who could not read or write. In 1972, The United Methodist Church established the Black College Fund to provide reliable support for United Methodist-related historically Black colleges and to offer a chance to everyone with a dream and a commitment to excel – regardless of race, class, gender, or ethnic heritage. Many of these students would fall through the cracks and never earn a college degree, although they have the intellectual capacity to do so.

Ministries like these happen, thanks to the way the people of The United Methodist Church live and give connectionally. I invite you to give generously, as we worship God through sharing our gifts, tithes, and offerings.

Click here to read more about the Black College Fund and the schools it supports.

Offertory Prayers:

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UM News photo by Mike DuBose

April 2022

Your offering last week empowered ministry within our congregation and responded to the needs of our community. It also supported the work of the worldwide United Methodist Church to ease the suffering of people forced to migrate from their country because of economic or political upheaval. Working on many levels with many agencies in The United Methodist Church and ecumenical partners, we work to build a more humane process to help those seeking asylum at the doorways to our country.

“We encourage United Methodists and others to amplify the suggestions offered by the General Board of Church and Society, the advocacy and justice agency of The United Methodist Church, and by Church World Service (CWS), a longstanding ecumenical partner in refugee resettlement and other migration work. Our work with National Justice For Our Neighbors (NJFON) includes support of their efforts to provide legal assistance for those seeking asylum as well as their increasing advocacy efforts.” - United Methodist Committee on Relief (UMCOR)

Ministries like these happen, thanks to the way the people of The United Methodist Church live and give connectionally. I invite you to give generously, as we worship God through sharing our gifts, tithes, and offerings.

Click here to read more about our ministry with migrants seeking asylum.

Offertory Prayers:

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