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26 Dec

Kwanzaa

An Affirmation for Kwanzaa: A 21st Century Africana Liturgy Resource

Liturgy

I believe in the Unity of the community of Triune God, the Three-in-One God who creates, saves, and sustains,
who expects us to practice Umoja, unity in diversity, and build up our communities, stand together, pray together,
worship together, fight injustice together, and love one another as Christ loves us.

An Affirmation for Kwanzaa: A 21st Century Africana Liturgy Resource »

Frequently Asked Questions About Kwanzaa

Article

What is Kwanzaa? Kwanzaa is an African American and Pan-African holiday that celebrates family, community, and culture. It is a cultural holiday rather than a religious one. Kwanzaa celebrates and affirms African cultural roots and history. The name "Kwanzaa" means "first fruits" in Swahili.  

Frequently Asked Questions About Kwanzaa »

Kwanzaa Reflections 2006

Article

Some of you already knew that my husband and I formerly served as GBGM World Division Missionaries in Ghana, West Africa. Missionary training prepared us for everything except holidays away from home. The fourth Thursday in November came around about six months after our arrival — just about the time that the glamour of living in West Africa had worn off. In retrospect, I confess that I don't know why it never occurred to us that we would be the only people on our block making a fuss about American Thanksgiving. But there we were, searching for just one turkey part and hoping to find a dusty can of cranberries in one of the few local shops that stocked foreign foods. 

Kwanzaa Reflections 2006 »

Kwanzaa Reflections 2007

Article

This year has been the strangest year of contradictions. For the first time in my 50 years of memory, a person of African descent is being taken seriously as a candidate for president of the United States. 

Kwanzaa Reflections 2007 »

Prayer for Kwanzaa

Liturgy

Gracious God,
Giver of life,
Thanks be to you for your many blessings,
And for the beauty of the bountiful Earth.

Prayer for Kwanzaa »