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Resources for Observing Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

by Safiyah Fosua

Martin Luther King, Jr.

Dr. King died at the hands of an assassin on April 4, 1968, a few months short of his fortieth birthday. Human history has forever been changed by the movement he headed. Our current level of sensitivity to human rights issues and inclusiveness can be traced to the strides gained by the Civil Rights Movements of the 1950s and 1960s. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a rare human being who sacrificed his life for a vision of equality for every person—not just African Americans. On November 2, 1983, both the Senate and the House of Representatives agreed that we should never forget Dr. King's contributions to the world: the third Monday in January was declared a national holiday.

Resources

The following online resources may assist you in helping your congregation understand who Martin Luther King, Jr. was and how he influenced our lives together.

(Note: We provide these links as a service to visitors and urge that you use discernment in checking the quality and adequacy of the content of each site. Please note that the Discipleship Ministries does not necessarily endorse any of the links listed on its webpages.)

The King Center in Atlanta, Georgia
A primary resource for learning about Martin Luther King, Jr.
 

Martin Luther King, Jr., National Historic Site
This site is maintained by the National Parks Department of the United States Government. The King Center in Atlanta is considered a National Historic site.
 

The National Civil Rights Museum (Memphis)
The Civil Rights movement did not begin or end with Martin Luther King, Jr., but it did flower under his powerful leadership. Learn more about other historical figures associated with the Civil Rights Movement at The National Civil Rights Museum (Memphis) Website.
 

African American Odyssey: A Quest for Full Citizenship
From the Library of Congress website.
 

Articles About Martin Luther King, Jr. 
From Scholastic.com
 

Helps for Celebrating Martin Luther King's Birthday
by Daniel T. Benedict
 

Come Let Us Dream Hymn Study–Come, Let Us Dream" is the second hymn text by retired United Methodist pastor John Middleton. It came as an extension of his first hymn, "Beloved Child, Beloved Community," which was an exploration of personal and corporate experiences of belovedness in the writings of Henry Nouwen and Martin Luther King, Jr. The fifth stanza of that first hymn was inspired by the writings of Martin Luther King, Jr. 
 

Beloved Child, Beloved Community
This hymn text by John Middleton is a way of bridging personal and corporate experiences of belovedness. The fifth stanza is an alternate for special occasions, such as Martin Luther King's birthday.
 

The third Sunday in January is observed by The United Methodist Church as Human Relations Day.
 

Let Us Speak of Mercy and Justice
We are indebted to the Rev. Brett Strobel, pastor of the Newman United Methodist Church, Grants Pass, Oregon, for writing these calls to worship and for compiling relevant resources for Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.
 

The Making of a Prophet — Celebrating the Life of Martin Luther King, Jr.
This worship service was celebrated on January 15, 2003, at the Wightman Chapel of the Scarritt-Bennett Center in Nashville, Tennessee. Discipleship Ministries posts it here so that churches and communities who may want to adapt it for use in their settings will have the benefit of this powerful recollection of the voice of Dr. King.
 

Celebrating the Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
This worship service was celebrated on January 17, 2007, at the Wightman Chapel of the Scarritt-Bennett Center in Nashville, Tennessee. Discipleship Ministries posts posts it here so that churches and communities who may want to adapt it for use in their settings will have the benefit of this powerful recollection of the voice of Dr. King.
 

Bishop White's 2015 Letter to Martin Luther King
Woodie White writes civil rights leader that for many Americans, the color of one’s skin still determines a human’s value. “But, I still believe, Martin.” 
 

Bishop Woodie White's 2012 Letter to Dr. King
Racism still stings, bishop tells King in his annual birthday letter to the late Martin Luther King, Jr.
 

Messages to Martin
UMTV follows the process that Bishop White uses to write his yearly letters to Dr. King.
 

Walking with King
A special feature from United Methodist News Service

 

Categories: Worship, Worship Planning, Lectionary Calendar, Civil Observances, Martin Luther King Day